Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Bronwyn Rodden #4 Journey to Ink

1  The Rocket, Enmore Park,  40cm x 40cm acrylic on canvas 2007



As with most of our friends, until recently I lived in the city to be near my job, although weekends were a chance to escape. But on work days I would pass this children’s play rocket in Enmore Park on my way to the bus stop and seeing it on my way home on winter nights with the moon behind it was always cheery. It has now become part of our preserved heritage! Children still play in it, although the top section has been blocked off to avoid injuries – some of our old playground equipment doesn’t stand up to today’s scrutiny for safety!



9 comments:

  1. Bronny's Rocket Scratchie

    this ticket was purchased
    a long way back

    gold tipped like a pyramid
    astronauts brought

    when we were only kids
    (memory's all gravel and scratch)

    our age was harmless speculation
    took off some skin and all sorts of dings

    we bounced around like dodgems then
    till a dinner gong called us in

    now the sun is under a rocketship sky
    further down, see another one's sunk

    smudge clouds make an horizon
    a kind of curved geometry

    gravity keeps the littlies falling
    a distance proportional to the square

    of elapsed... ouch the boat is lost
    that brought us across

    those pines of the distance
    about to take off

    no knowing which way
    they'll fly

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    Replies
    1. Fantastic Kit! Ouch the boat is lost...

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  2. It is a lovely work and then the poem and I grew up with visits to this rocket, long trudges up Victoria Rd from where my grandparents lived, down in The Warren. Nice work the pair of you.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Kerri, hope the trudging led to fun!

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  3. How nice to find an image
    I carry in my mind's eye
    a playground rocket ship!

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  4. I love the archaeology of the future here and its faded colour :) Similar colours (together with the rocket's hoop skeleton) in a fabric my mother used to make cushion covers. This is ironic nostalgia done brilliantly.

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